Get Business Cash Advance Loans Immediately

Getting a business cash advance is simple and easy for most small businesses, and even those who have poor credit scores. While this does not apply to bank loans, these are the requirements of private lenders, and private lenders are amongst the leading funders at this time.

Most business owners who are looking for funding and are unaware of the current requirements and developments of the financial sector, visit their local bank. This is the way people believe a loan is to be obtained, via the bank. However, banks are not very enthusiastic about funding small business, and as a result a whole new industry has cropped up to meet the demand.

Private lenders often fill the gap between businesses and banks. There is the very large segment of small businesses that are stuck in the middle, who don’t qualify for bank loans and yet require financing. Private lenders fill this gap providing many of them with the much required business cash advance in the USA.

The services provided by private lenders

The funding that private lenders provide is typically known as MCA or merchant cash advance loans. These kinds of loans are short term loans that are for a maximum duration of 12 months. The repayment options are easy and flexible, and small business owners can work with the funder to set the method that most suits their requirements.

The application process to apply for a business cash advance is simple and quick, with the private funder generally requiring basic information, and a lot less than those of banks. The basic information required by private lenders to provide an MCA are as mentioned here.

1. How old the business is

2. The gross monthly sale of the business

3. How much they require

4. Purpose of the funds i.e. working capital, business expansion, purchasing inventory, purchasing equipment etc.

5. If the business owner has other loans and if he or she is in bankruptcy.

These are some of the basic types of questions that a small business owner who is applying for an MCA would need to answer. The outstanding difference between an application for an MCA and bank loans is the fact that banks require detailed information related to financial statements. Private lenders basically need a broad picture of the ground realities of the business applying for the loan. Unlike banks all decisions are not based on the statements of the small business.

While banks and private lenders may have a different way of looking at things, private lenders do take care to ensure the ground realities of the small business are as they should be. Banks rely heavily on financial statements when reaching a conclusion related to funding a business.

Features of the MCA loan application process

While it is possible that you will be asked about your credit score even when you are going to apply for private funding. The credit score is not a determining factor for an MCA. These loans are unsecured loans and as a result collateral and security are not required as well.

When credit scores, collateral and securities are not holding back small businesses, the possibility of getting funded is a lot higher. These are the basic weak areas of most small businesses, which hamper their ability to get funded by in large. When these weak areas are removed from between a small business owner and the funding they seek, the process becomes a lot smoother for them.

Collateral is something that most small business owners find difficult to show. Typically, only with a private lender can a small business owner expect to receive a business cash advance with bad credit.

Another great feature is the fact that small business owners can receive the funding they require very quickly as well. The quickest a business owner can receive the money in their business account is 48 to 72 hours, from the time they submit a complete application. At the latest this time frame would be a week or two. Banks on the other hand are in no particular hurry to provide business funding, and a realistic time frame would be a couple of months to receive the money.

5 Types of Business Insurance and Why You Need Them

No matter the size or nature of your business, one thing that remains the same is the need for business insurance. There are many different aspects of your business that you’ll want to take into consideration when looking for new business insurance – or reviewing your current insurance coverage. Since every business is different, each one will have different insurance requirements. For example, a company that produces physical goods may need different insurance than a company which offers services. In either scenario, there are some similarities, and listed here are a few types of insurance that all businesses should consider.

Workers’ Compensation Insurance – for your employees

Workers’ Comp insurance is required by law in almost every state. It can provide coverage for medical costs and a portion of lost wages for an employee who becomes injured or ill on the job. Typically, this type of insurance only covers injuries or illness that occur on the job site – for example, if an employee slips and falls on a wet floor.

Since the laws regarding Workers’ Comp can be different depending on where your company is located, it’s important to work with an insurance professional to make sure you’re getting the coverage that’s required, as well as what you need for your particular business.

General Liability Insurance

General Liability Insurance is designed to protect you and your business from a variety of claims, including accidents, injuries, or claims of negligence. This type of insurance can help pay for things like property damage, medical expenses, libel, slander, legal costs, and faulty products. No one expects to get sued, but the reality is that it’s always a possibility. You don’t want to leave your business open to these types of situations, and the broader the protection, the better.

Professional Liability Insurance – “Errors and Omissions” coverage

Professional Liability Insurance can also be known as “Errors and Omissions Insurance,” or “Malpractice Insurance.” It protects you from lawsuits that allege negligence in providing professional services, providing shoddy work, or making mistakes or omissions. This type of insurance is particularly important if you have a service-based business, but can also be necessary for other types of businesses as well. Mistakes happen – so adequate Professional Liability Insurance can be helpful, even if you don’t think you’ll need it.

Property Insurance

The definition of “property” is broad, and can mean different things to different types of businesses. That’s why it’s important to make sure you carry adequate Commercial Property Insurance. Without this type of insurance, most small businesses wouldn’t be able to replace their equipment should something happen to cause damage or destruction. Property covered by this type of insurance can include buildings, computers, inventory, supplies and equipment. There are two types of Property Insurance: “all-risk” policies cover just about everything, and is a good way to avoid duplication or overlap of coverage, as well as gaps in trying to cover your liabilities. “Peril-specific” policies, or “named-peril” coverage applies only to particular perils that are specifically named in the policy. They’re usually needed when there is a high risk in a very particular area.

Life Insurance / Key Executive Insurance – protection and benefit

Offering life insurance for employees can be a valuable benefit when trying to attract high-quality employees. A business can even offer additional coverage for executives. These employees are deemed to be crucial to the running and success of the business, and may sometimes require additional insurance, above and beyond what the normal employee benefits provide. This can be another benefit in attracting top talent.

A business can also offer special “Key Person” policies for employees without whom the business could not function. Key Person Insurance protects against a key employee’s unexpected death – often times the benefit amount equals the expected revenue loss and costs required to find and train a suitable replacement. The business pays the premiums, and the insurance is considered a business asset.

It’s possible to combine some of these basic coverages as a package policy, often referred to as a Business Owner’s Policy, or BOP. Many insurance companies bundle certain coverages, and this can save you money, as long as you make sure you get the proper type of coverage.

Even if you feel you have adequate business insurance coverage that meets all your current needs, it’s still advisable to review all your coverage on an annual basis, to make sure that your coverage continues to provide everything that you need. This is particularly important if you or your business have experienced any major changes, such as change in family status, or a significant increase or decrease in business activity. Additionally, be sure to work with a reputable, licensed insurance agent or broker, who has knowledge regarding business like yours.

Business Insurance 101: What You Need to Know

So you started your own business. You’ve seen a hole in the market or come up with a brilliant new idea. You’ve got things underway and maybe even started to make a bit of money. Well, before you take one step further, it’s time to think about insurance for your business. After all, you took a big risk starting your own company and that means you need to mitigate those risks as best you can.

The hardline fact about coverage and businesses is that you need it. Everything you have for your business, from vehicles to basic liability, requires insurance. Without it, you could put everything you’ve built in jeopardy, open yourself up to crippling financial issues, or even be in violation of the law. But not to worry, here are some basics about coverage of your business that can help you get the protection you need to succeed.

Types of Business Insurance

The first thing you need to understand about coverage and your business is the different types that exist. Depending on your business, you may need specific kinds of insurance. In general, business coverage can be broken down into three broad categories: insurance for owners or partners and key employees, coverage of business earnings and property, and liability insurance. Here is a breakdown of each different kind.

Insurance for Business Owners, Partners and Key Employees

If you own a business, you need specific types of coverage depending on how your business is set up. These can include, but are not limited to:

• Life insurance – This coverage protects your family if something happens to you. If you are the sole proprietor of your business, this insurance is key because business owners are personally liable for all the debts of the business.

• Disability insurance – In the event that you are injured or fall ill, disability insurance will provide you with an income for a specified amount of time.

• Partnership insurance or buy-sell coverage – If you have a partner in your business, this insurance will help you purchase your partner’s shares and continue running the business in the event of their death.

• Critical illness insurance – If you become critically ill, this coverage will give you a lump sum of money to help you through the situation.

• Key person insurance – This coverage protects you in the event of the death or loss of those employees who are most important to your business.

Insurance for Business and Property Earnings

On top of coverage that protects individuals, your business may also require the following types of insurance to protect its assets and earnings. Bear in mind that businesses run out of your home may require coverage beyond your home insurance. It is always a good idea to contact your coverage company to discuss running a business out of your home.

• Property insurance – This coverage covers any buildings or property owned by your business if it suffers damage or destruction from fire, earthquakes, avalanches and other such disasters.

• Contents insurance – If you have a property or building that stores things for your business, such as a warehouse or storefront, this policy covers the loss of those contents. Note that even if you are leasing space, you may still require contents insurance as your lease will likely make you responsible for what you put inside the leased space. Home business owners will need to contact their insurance companies to discuss what needs to be included in their home policy.

• Business interruption insurance – When disaster strikes, this policy will cover you for the time that your business cannot run at its proper efficiency.

• Vehicle insurance – If your company owns vehicles, you are legally required to have coverage. If you use your personal vehicle for your business, make sure that you contact your insurance company.

Liability Insurance

Liability covers you in the event of a mistake or accident for which you can be held responsible. There are three kinds to consider when you own a business: personal liability, product liability, and professional. These cover you from personal responsibility, something going wrong with your products, and from lawsuits filed by your clients, respectively.

Starting your own business is a big risk, but that doesn’t mean you should take unnecessary chances. If you own a business, you need the right coverage. Be sure to shop around and find the insurance package that’s right for your business. If you have any additional questions, we can help you make sense of your policies to ensure you have the right kinds of coverage from the right kinds of insurance companies.